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Showing posts from February, 2011

Flow Data Interpretation for Steelheaders

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Flow is a vitally important factor for understanding fish movement in the grand scheme of steelhead fishing. Flow is arguably the single-most important variable when taken in the context of fish movement, just as temperatures dictate when fish begin to run, when they spawn, where they locate within a stream, and when they are the most vulnerable to bait or fly presentations. But even there, you'll be looking for a certain type of "flow".

Many people are initially baffled when it comes to interpreting flow charts from USGS and others. Fortunately, the folks at Minnesota Steelheader can walk you through interpretation and when you are done with this article, you’ll be able to read the charts like a pro.

To understand the charts, it is helpful to understand a few terms that are used on any chart you might encounter:

CFS: Cubic Feet per Second or "CFS," is the rate of flow in streams and rivers. It is equal to a volume of water one foot high, one foot long and one …

Pom-Pom Eggs - The Inexpensive Glo-Bug

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One of the most useful and productive fly patterns you can carry when you fish the runs for steelhead, kamloops and salmon are eggs. Any time free drifting eggs are in the stream is a good time to fish them and, they can be fished with any type of equipment from Fly to Spinning rods. A wise SE Wisconsin guide once told me, "Any pattern will catch fish, as long as it has an egg in it."

As with all flies, you will go through A LOT of them. One option is to purchase them, but at a dollar a pop or more, making your own is a simple and inexpensive proposition.

In a short amount of time and with just a few simple tools, you can crank out eggs by the hundreds at just pennies per piece. I’m going to assume that you know how to do some basic tying; but if you don’t, this is a good pattern to start learning with because it will teach you some of the basics: How to Start Your Thread, how to position materials, and the Whip Finish.

On Sizing
I use the metric standard because it is easier th…